Home of 2030

Looking to answer a number of crucial questions about how we create communities and housing at volume for the future this is our competition winning scheme.

Working with a number of industry leading consultants in a team including, Igloo, Elliott Wood engineers, Useful Projects, Expedition Engineering, Cast Consultancy and Landsmith Associates the scheme was developed over two stages of the competitive process.

Our scheme developed ideas on how the home might be procured and constructed in a bespoke but scalable way. Building homes that are flexible, adaptable and create a sense of community with sustainability and biodiversity hard wired in from the outset. The homes allow density by removing cars to periphery and therefore are safe, inclusive and fun places to live and grow up.

 

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10 MawsonKerr Home of 2030 Exploded House Technical Diagram

 

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Plinth House, Northumberland

Plinth House is located within the existing sunken walled garden of a Victorian Manor House. The proposal is for a highly contextual and contemporary home, providing a sensitive response to the setting of this Country pile, its grounds, and the openness of the Greenbelt area. The house has two main elements the 'plinth' wrapping around the garden and the 'pavilion' sitting on top of the plinth. The design allows for the intimate views, tranquility and the connection with the outside – the 'Plinth'. Long views across the valley, openness and connection to the upper entrance level - the 'Pavilion'.

The design in effect creates a cloister that sits within the existing parameters of the sunken garden and reaches out into the garden. Part of the cloister is glazed and therefore creating the internal spaces and part external with the outdoor kitchen and South facing sitting area.

Our approach has been to integrate off-grid and environmental technologies that are unobtrusive to the house' functionality. The major features to allow the house to have low energy and carbon strategies are: embedded solar to the roof of the pavilion, ground source heat in the walled garden and battery technology coupled with super insulation and airtightness to enable an off grid dwelling.

Calverley Old Hall

Calverley Old Hall near Leeds is a Grade I listed medieval manor house with fabric dating from the 13th to 17th centuries. While part has been a Landmark holiday let for many years, the rest of the site had fallen into disuse and such decay that it is currently on the Heritage at Risk Register. In 2017 an international design competition was launched; our design was shortlisted against 75 proposals, we went on be part of the final interview process.

Our proposal imagined recreating the former uses of the original hall in their configuration, bringing back the glory of the main congregation spaces with historic fabric retained throughout. Any interventions were to be in contemporary materials to be easily read against the original building. Using CLT as the main proposed material four bedrooms with en-suites were created with the dramatic medieval spaces kept as livable follies for banquets and gatherings.

Salford Meadows Bridge

Required to span from the busy A6 to historic Peel Park in Salford our entry to the RIBA Salford Meadows Bridge Competition draws on the rich history of the Cotton Mills in the surrounding area.

Designed in collaboration with structural engineers Shed, the Bridge has two pylons formed in corten steel creating a focal element with the deck hanging via a dynamic cable weave reminiscent of the large industrial looms.

Norbord OSB Low Rise High Density Housing

This housing prototype was developed for a RIBA Journal competition looking into the potential for Norbord OSB as a product for creating affordable housing. Working with the material our proposal pushed the material in terms of providing shelter, structure and form within a 4.8×4.8m module that allowed for interlocking units.

The way the units tessellate presents a private space available to each unit proving a density of 115 units per hectare. We chose a brown field site in Byker to show how the units could be planned forming a new community complex on unused plots of land. CNC techniques are utilised to give minimal waste and allow construction on site by relatively unskilled labour.

Our design went on to win the competition with discussions ongoing to develop the prototype for affordable housing

Awards

Winner RIBA Journal Habitat Award

Luanda House

This project looked at the abject poverty in the outskirt of the Angolan capital where many thousands of families arrive to seeking a living. In 2010 the situation was verging on a humanitarian crisis with mega slums developing on road sides with poor sanitation and quality of life for many. The project brief asked to look at construction techniques and the way in which the home works in this part of the world.

Our solution is constructed from adobe bricks, easily available and can be made from the available earth on site with a lightweight roof promoting a passive cooling and thermal mass. The curved form is derived from the vernacular round houses found throughout western Africa; elongating and opening the form provides a semi private courtyard space at the threshold and private shaded courtyard to the rear using the irregular non tessellating form to present positive voids between neighbouring buildings.

Low in energy use and very cheap to construct, our proposal is hoped to give an alternative life changing “vernacular” home.

 

Tyne Tee

The Staithes at Dunston, a listed structure, is considered to be the largest timber structure in Europe. This relic of the industrial era currently collects flotsam and is slowly decomposing in the silt of the Tyne.

Our light touch proposal is to bring this back to life as an ecological gold driving range where you can “hit some balls and feed the fish”. This is part of the Forgotten Spaces North East competition where surreal and wild ideas are pitched in a public arena discussing areas requiring regeneration.

There is a more serious debate behind the light-hearted solution; the loss of this iconic structure. We are putting our whole-hearted support behind this industrial monument and will be generating other ideas in the coming months.

Awards

Forgotten Spaces North East Winner

 

Cantilever House

We are appointed to create a new housing model which can be arranged and adaptable to suit multiple locations across a steeply sloping rural site, providing multiple living conditions within the same structural framework.

County Durham has many sites of significant terrain, which can present issues to standard housing types but here we made this situation an opportunity for the cantilever living space. The design has sleeping accommodation embedded into the site in the lower ground floor area which in itself becomes a plinth for the larger accommodation block above to soar over. Designed as a timber frame solution, the upper block can be arranged with several bedroom options, larger vaulted living space and a number of cladding alternatives giving a variety of outcomes.

The palette of external materials in this self build development keeps to a rural and natural temperament, this has been driven with a strong sustainable agenda. The palette relates strongly to vernacular architecture giving connection within the area and an indication of availability both locally and naturally. The material palette we are suggesting for the scheme includes natural stone, timber cladding and glass maximising daylight.

Malmo Quay Masterplan

We were invited by urban developers Igloo to submit a design proposal for the Malmo Quay where the Ouseburn meets Newcastle Quayside as part of a design competition.

Working with the Urbed masterplan strategy our proposal described the external community space as the generator of the resulting plots which housed the cycle hub, restaurant and live/work units. The view from the Freetrade Pub was a key design driver in the massing with urban space created on the roof of the restaurant to keep the view from obstruction.

The cycle hub building has a dynamic but light structural form to reflect the function it houses and also giving a landmark to this amazing site on the Tyne River.